Even the newest voting machines are liable to reprogramming, cyber consultants warn on the NAACP-convened Greensboro assembly | Native information



James E. Avent Jr. and Ronald Mayers listen as NC NAACP President T. Anthony Spearman and voting machine analysts raise concerns about electronic voting machines during a town hall meeting in Greensboro, NC on September 16, 2019.



NAACP has concerns about voting machines

NC NAACP President T. Anthony Spearman was accompanied by voting machine analysts who raised concerns about electronic voting machines during a city hall meeting in Greensboro, NC on September 16, 2019.



NAACP has concerns about voting machines

NC NAACP President T. Anthony Spearman was accompanied by voting machine analysts who raised concerns about electronic voting machines during a city hall meeting in Greensboro, NC on September 16, 2019.



NAACP has concerns about voting machines

NC NAACP President T. Anthony Spearman was accompanied by voting machine analysts who raised concerns about electronic voting machines during a city hall meeting in Greensboro, NC on September 16, 2019.

GREENSBORO – A hacker hired to find faults in voting machines around the world and a computer code writer appointed by a judge to forensically investigate a controversial election said at an emergency meeting of the NAACP that even the voting machines of the latest era are prone to reprogramming.

The panel of cyber experts that was videotaped into the discussion at the New Light Baptist Church took pictures of barcode systems such as those in Guilford County.

“It suggests more information than there is,” said Duncan Buell, a computer scientist and engineer at the University of South Carolina. Buell is part of a team that has been reviewing election data in his state, uncovering issues that have resulted in untold votes in previous elections.

The barcodes are only as good as they are programmed, Buell said. Without a ballot showing how people voted, they would be unreliable even when recounted.

Marilyn Marks of the Coalition for Good Governance agreed.

“They’re essentially forcing you to cast a vote you can’t read,” said Marks, who was in the audience and sued in the state of Georgia for paperless voting.

The discussion comes as the NAACP fights against so-called voter suppression efforts, which range from unnecessary voter identification to hackable voting machines. The discussion was streamed live in churches in North Carolina in Raleigh, Fayetteville, Charlotte and on Broadway.

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